Intersection of Intimate Partner Violence and HIV in Women

National Black Women’s HIV/AIDS Network, Inc.
Launches the “Our Lives Matter” Campaign to Increase Awareness of the Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence against Women and Girls and Gender-related Health Disparities

November 17, 2014- The Office of National AIDS Policy, the White House Advisor on Violence Against Women and the White House Council on Women and Girls released a report highlighting the efforts of Federal agencies to implement the recommendations of the Interagency Federal Work Group on the Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence against Women and Girls and Gender-Related Health Disparities in October, during Domestic Violence Awareness month.

The National Black Women’s HIV/AIDS Network, Inc. (NBWHAN), applauds the work of these federal agencies and has committed to fully engage with these entities to ensure that the information contained in the report reaches black women and girls who are disproportionately impacted by HIV, partner and dating violence and the broader Black community.

Over one-third (36%) of women in the United States have experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime; of these women, 69% report experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) at age 25 or younger, and 22% experienced IPV for the first time between the ages of 11 and 17 years.1 According to the National Violence Against Women survey, Black women experience higher rates of intimate partner homicide and significantly higher rates (67%) of IPV than other women in the U.S.2 Adult and childhood trauma, physical violence and sexual abuse are major factors fueling the HIV epidemic among Black women and girls. Women and adolescent girls accounted for 20% of new HIV infections in the United States in 20103 and represented approximately 21% of HIV diagnoses among adults and adolescents in 2011.3 Sixty-four percent (64%) of new infections occurred Black women in 2010. The rate of new infections among black women was 20 times that of white women, and over 4 times the rate among Hispanic/Latina women.4

“We are inspired by the work of the Federal government,” said Barbara Joseph, Chair of the Network. “The release of this report update on the activities taking place across the Federal agencies to address the intersection of HIV, violence against women and girls and gender-related health disparities will significantly impact the lives of Black women and girls. It’s now our turn to join the effort”, continued Ms. Joseph.

To this end, NBWHAN has launched the “Our Lives Matter” Campaign. This social-media campaign seeks to accomplish the following:
1. Raise awareness of the intersection of HIV and violence against black women and girls;
2. Educate black women and girls on the intersection of HIV and intimate partner violence
3. Educate and engage providers about the work of the federal agencies and encourage them to begin to implement some if the priority activities outlined in the report update.
4. Ensure that screening for both HIV and IPV are being provided in primary care clinics and IPV screening is provided in HIV clinics; that trauma informed care for women living with and at risk for HIV is being provided in clinic facilities; that outreach and prevention efforts to young women of color is expanded to include young Black girls residing in communities where HIV and IPV rates are high.

NBWHAN challenges all of our sister and brother networks, community and faith organizations, sororities and fraternities, health centers and federally qualified health centers, to get involved and join our effort to improve the health of Black women and girls living with and at risk of HIV and intimate partner violence. We have committed to this effort because it’s the right thing to do, it speaks to our mission, and it exemplifies our permeable that “our lives matter.”

SO TAKE THE CHALLENGE:
1. Download the full report .
2. Read the report and tell us why you commit to the challenge.
3. Share the report with three (3) members of your networks before December 1, 2014 and you will become a member of the “Our Lives Matter” Champions.
4. Share the report with six (6) members of your network before December 1, 2014 and you will become a member of the “Our Lives Matter” Champions plus receive an honorable mention on our Facebook page.
5. Share the report with more than 10 members of your network before December 1, 2014 and you will become a member of the “Our Lives Matter” Champions, receive an honorable mention on our Facebook page and receive one free annual membership to the NBWHAN.

WE ALSO WANT YOU TO:
6. Let us know the objective and the activities you want to learn more about.
7. Send us a clip telling us what’s going on in your local community and we will feature it on our “Our Lives Matter.” YouTube channel on Tuesday, March 10, 2015, National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.
8. Make the “Our Lives Matter” Campaign a part of your 2015 personal and organizational work-plans.
If you have any questions regarding the report, please post them on www.facebook.com/NBWHAN. ___________________________________________________________________________
About the National Black Women’s HIV/AIDS Network, Inc. The National Black Women’s HIV/AIDS Network, Inc., (NBWHAN) is organized to provide leadership and expertise in the prevention and spread of HIV/AIDS and other health disparities that affect black women and girls nationally and internationally. The mission of the NBWHAN is to reduce the burden of morbidity, mortality and stigma of HIV/AIDS and other health disparities associated with gender, social, and economic inequities among Black women and girls.

References:
CDC HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report. 2012:17(4). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/statistics_hssr_vol_17_no_4 pdf.
NIJCDC.(2000). Findings From the National Violence Against Women Survey: Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence.
CDC. (2013). Diagnosis of HIV Infection in the United States and Dependent Areas, 2011. HIV Surveillance Report; 23.
CDC. (2012). Estimated HIV incidence among adults and adolescents in the United States, 2007–2010. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report; 17(4)

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